Steve Ressler

Gov 2.0 guide to Gov 2.0 Radio

Gov 2.0 Radio is a weekly podcast that “captures the thoughts of public and private sector leaders using Web 2.0 to make government more effective, collaborative and transparent.” The show is held every Sunday at 9 p.m. Eastern Time on BlogTalkRadio.

Gov 2.0 Radio is hosted by Adriel Hampton and co-hosts GovTwit founder Steve Lunceford and GovLoop founder Steve Ressler.

GovFreshTV interview with Gov 2.0 Radio host Adriel Hampton:

How changes at Ning affect GovLoop community

In light of recent changes at Ning, the social network service that powers GovLoop, I asked founder Steve Ressler to comment on what impact this will have on the GovLoop community.

Changes at Ning can only be a good thing for GovLoop. As they mentioned in their press release, they are focusing more on delivering premium services to premier, paying networks like GovLoop.

There are lots of additional and different requirements that are needed when you run a robust 30,000 person social network like GovLoop that is different than running a 50-person free, family reunion site. For example, one key problem we have been trying to solve is with over 5,000 blogs, 700 groups, and 30,000 people, how can GovLoop members find the right content, groups, and colleagues relevant to them. These are the types of problems that Ning can focus on.

On a side note, I think it is an interesting development that government should pay attention to in Gov 2.0. I’m a big believer in low-cost to free (and open-source), tools but there is some truth to the statement “nothing in life is free.” The start-ups we all love and appreciate all need business models to survive and provide services so we shouldn’t be against paying for products that provide valuable service – it may be good for all of us in the long run.

Punk Rock Gov 2.0 Radio

I’m a big fan of Gov 2.0 Radio.

What I appreciate most is host Adriel Hampton‘s iterative approach to improving it. Each episode is a subtle experiment in something new. It’s not pretentious, over-produced or trendy chatter. It’s quality niche content and every episode is a solid course on what’s happening in the Gov 2.0, open government movement. Adriel and his co-hosts, Steve Lunceford and Steve Ressler, do a great job of connecting listeners to leaders and create a true sense of community.

Last week, Adriel and I met to discuss an upcoming San Francisco Gov 2.0 event we’re working on (stay tuned). We talked about Gov 2.0 Radio, and I offered to brand, design and develop the new site, working from the GovFresh Gov 2.0 WordPress Theme. We didn’t deliberate on quality (though I must say, it looks pretty sharp). We took an iterative approach to the new site. Like the show, it’ll get better over time.

Meet the new Gov 2.0 Radio.

Adventures for the Cure wins GovLoop AwesomeGov contest

GovLoop announced Adventures for the Cure has won the AwesomeGov Fund contest and will donate $1,789 to the charity, founded in 2005 by Adam Driscoll and Patrick Blair.

The donation will support Kupenda for the Children, a camp for disabled children in Kenya, and Extreme Weekend for Children with Diabetes, a camp for children with diabetes.

More details on GovLoop.

Video announcement from GovLoop founder Steve Ressler:

Video with AFC founders Adam Driscoll and Patrick Blair:

Open gov, Gov 2.0 leaders react to White House Open Government Directive

Here’s what open government and Gov 2.0 leaders are saying about the new White House Open Government Directive.

What’s your take?

Carl Malamud, Public.Resource.Org (@CarlMalamud)

Carl Malamud

“This is great. No equivocating, vacillating, hemming, or hawing. This is all good, big thumbs up to the folks that made this happen.”


Ellen Miller, Sunlight Foundation (@EllnMllr)

Ellen Miller

“The Open Government Directive demonstrates how the Obama administration is matching its aspirational goals with concrete policies and accountability measures. I expect it will create a sea change in how the government and public interact, what information we as citizens have at our fingertips, and that it will redefine that public information means that its online. It’s going to be up to all of us to participate and monitor how well government meets these goals.”


Craig Newmark, Craigslist (@craignewmark)

Craig Newmark

“The Open Government Initiative is a huge commitment to:

  • listening to all Americans, hearing what they have to say
  • telling people what’s going on in government, like where the money goes

The results will create effective large-scale grassroots democracy and far greater fiscal responsibility.

I feel that these efforts are complementary to the adoption of the US Consititution.”


Chris Vein, City and County of San Francisco (@Veinesque)

Chris Vein

The President’s Directive is a tremendous step forward. It not only further explains the President’s vision, but it provides an aggressive roadmap and timeline for getting Federal, State and local governments to improve transparency, increase participation and collaboration. San Francisco is proud to have responded early to the President’s call for open government with our Open Data Directive and DataSF initiatives. The President’s Directive will help San Francisco improve and extend our goal of a more transparent and open City.

Dustin Haisler, City of Manor, TX (@dustinhaisler)

Dustin Haisler

“The Open Government Directive is a great starting point for the open-gov movement in the federal government; however, one thing to consider is whether open data is truly “usable” data for our constituents. Instead of just putting datasets online for mashup artists, we should also focus on the interface our citizens will use to get the information. In addition, multi-agency collaboration starting on the local level will be a very important key to the overall initiative’s success. Overall, I think the directive is good move in the right direction for the federal government.”


Peter Corbett, iStrategyLabs (@corbett3000)

Peter Corbett

“We’ve all been eagerly awaiting the OGD and it’s not a let down by any stretch. It will lend support and clarification to what is a complex issue for our government: how to become more open, transparent and participatory. What we’re seeing here is the innovative use of technology and smart policy to unleash the talent of the American people. I’m most excited about how the work we’ve done on Apps for Democracy will soon be institutionalized throughout federal agencies when OMB releases guidance for how to use challenges, prizes and other incentives for stimulating citizen driven innovation.”


Andrew Wilson, Health & Human Services (@AndrewPWilson)

Andrew Wilson

“This directive represents a significant step toward the president’s goals of transparency, public participation and collaboration. One element that I would like to see emphasized as part of the implementation is a concerted, systemic effort to improve the tools government employees have available to collaborate internally. For me, improved internal collaboration is an essential element to developing the framework for a more fully engaged and responsive government. Imagine a world where cross-departmental information flow was so robust that citizens could interact with ANY agency on ANY issue and could get a timely, complete and helpful response.”


Steve Ressler, GovLoop (@govloop)

Steve Ressler

“Open Government Directive is a great first step in the open gov/Gov 2.0 movement. While the data and transparency piece is important, I’m most interested in how agencies create their own open gov plans and what actions they take from their planning exercise. I believe most of the movement for open gov starts when it is done at the agency level and solving true mission needs.”


Clay Johnson, Sunlight Labs (@cjoh)

Clay Johnson

“This is a great and ambitious plan that’s particularly challenging in terms of both logistics and technology. It is the equivalent of the “putting a man on the moon” of the Transparency movement in the federal government. Challenging, awe-inspiring and risky.”


Adriel Hampton, Gov 2.0 Radio (@adrielhampton)

Adriel Hampton

“I am concerned that some may use the document and its compliance deadlines as a simple checklist. However, as did the president’s January open government memo, this document empowers the growing ranks of Gov 2.0 innovators. Its guidance on data release and standards is also valuable and needed.”


Steve Lunceford, GovTwit (@dslunceford)

Steve Lunceford

“I think this is a great step to formalize a process and “movement” that has already been spreading throughout government. I would have like to have seen more guidance around transparency, participation and collaboration from an interagency standpoint versus just citizen interaction, but believe that could be a natural output as agencies strive to meet the various deadlines. It will also be interesting to see how quickly and enthusiastically agencies respond to a directive which lays out new unfunded mandates given the many priorities they are already juggling.”


Bob Gourley, CTOvision (@bobgourley)

Bob Gourley

The most important part of the directive, in my opinion, is the attachment with guidance on plan formulation. The thought put into that means agencies do not have to recreate the wheel when formulating their own plan. The part of the directive that we all need to watch out for abuse on: it seems to apply to all other than OMB and above. Yet history has shown those are the ones we need the most openness from.


Brian Ahier (@ahier)

Brian Ahier

“I am thrilled to see the emphasis on open government this directive represents. I hope to see government agencies able to meet the deadlines for action established by the Open Government Directive. I also want to see citizen participation in determining the high value data sets to be published. Since this directive also requires the data be published in an open format, it will be nice to have documents available where the data is not shielded within the pdf format.”


New book ‘State of the eUnion: Government 2.0 and Onwards’ available free for download

State of the eUnion: Government 2.0 and Onwards

A new book, State of the eUnion: Government 2.0 and Onwards, is now available free for download. The book, a compilation of essays from 34 Gov 2.0 thought leaders, will soon be available in print through Amazon and elsewhere.

From the publisher:

“In many ways, eGovernment has come of age. The use of IT and digital media is today part of everything government does, so the ‘e’ is becoming obsolete. ‘eGovernment is just Government,’ as the saying goes, but it is important to realise that the ‘e’ has changed government forever, and will keep doing so, and hence we now talk about Government 2.0, ” said John Gotze.

The book’s contributors touch on a number of different subjects, all related to making government work better. Some deal with getting government data out into the open, breaking down data silos. Others focus on how to interact with the public through interactive websites. Still others discuss how to facilitate organizational change that will open up government.

Contributors:

  • Richard Allan, Facebook
  • Kim Normann Andersen, Copenhagen Business School
  • Tony Bovaird, Birmingham
 University
  • Lee Bryant, HeadShift
  • Joanne Caddy, OECD
  • Stephen Collins, AcidLabs
  • Dan Doney, US 
Office 
of 
the 
Director 
of 
National
 Intelligence
  • James Downe, Cardiff 
University
  • Mark Drapeau, National
 Defense
 University
  • Bengt Feil, TuTech
 Innovation
  • Dave Fletcher, State of Utah
  • Michael Friis, Folkets
 Ting
  • Matt Leighninger, Deliberative
 Democracy
 Consortium
  • Lawrence Lessig, Harvard
 Law
 School
  • Rolf Lührs, TuTech
 Innovation
  • Elke Löffler, Governance 
International
  • Rony Medaglia, Copenhagen Business School
  • Philipp S. Müller, Center
 for
 Public
 Management
 and 
Governance
  • David Osimo, Tech4i2
  • Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Inc.
  • Tommy Dejbjerg Pedersen, Geekhouse
  • Chris Potts, Dominic Barrow
  • Steve Radick, Booz
 Allen
 Hamilton
  • Harald Rathmann, TuTech
 Innovation
  • Steve Ressler, GovLoop
  • Alexandra Samuel, Social
Signal
  • W. David Stephenson, Stephenson Strategies
  • Hanne Sørum, The
 Norwegian
 School
 of
 Information
 Technology
  • Ariel Waldman, Spacehack.org
  • David Weinberger, Harvard
 Berkman
 Center
 for
 Internet
 & Society
  • Olov Östberg, Mid
 Sweden
 University

Gov 2.0 Radio: Shaking Gov 2.0 Ground

Listen

[audio:gov20radio091018.mp3]

Episode

Shaking Gov 2.0 Ground: Join federal Web developer Scott Horvath for a lively discussion of the U.S. Geographical Survey’s Web initiatives, including “Did You Feel That?” and the Twitter Earthquake Detector (TED) project. With hosts Adriel Hampton, Steve Ressler and Steve Lunceford. More Gov 2.0 Radio »

GovLoop grows to 20K, hires employee number 2

GovLoopGovLoop announced today it surpassed 20,000 members in October and added Andrew Krzmarzick as Director of Community Engagement. Krzmarzick will be responsible for “outreach, partnership, and engagement to help the community grow and bring even greater value to members.”

Krzmarzick has played a key role in building GovLoop and has worked closely with GovLoop founder Steve Ressler on other projects. Prior to joining GovLoop, Krzmarzick was Senior Project Coordinator at the Graduate School, (formerly the Graduate School, United States Department of Agriculture).

From GovLoop:

Krzmarzick will serve as the official GovLoop Community Manager. In this role, he will be responsible for engaging and growing the GovLoop community – reinforcing its core mission of connecting government to improve government.

“Andy is a true government 2.0 visionary and has been a long-time advocate of the GovLoop community,” said Ressler. “He brings an unmatched level of expertise and passion for growing the community and increasing its power for the government sector. Andy and I have worked together previously in launching www.iampublicservice.org, and there is no one better to champion GovLoop and continue its contributions to public sector problem solving.”

“I am excited to officially be on the GovLoop team,” Krzmarzick said. “I’ve watched with admiration over the past 15 months as the community has grown and the members have connected with one another to share information and ideas generously. I see its potential as a place where people in and around government can turn in real time to get linked with the people and information they need to perform their jobs more effectively. Our members are passionate and I am eager to serve them in a full-time capacity as we collectively develop innovative solutions and replicate best practices across all levels of government – both in the United States and beyond.”

Ressler’s asked Krzmarzick to focus on the following:

  • How can we further increase collaboration amongst the current members of GovLoop?
  • How can we do better outreach to potential members who would love GovLoop?
  • How can we better connect disparate conversations and turn them into knowledge solutions?
  • How do we move from solving 5-10 government problems daily to 50-100 government problems?

More:

Gov 2.0 Radio galore

I’m a huge fan of Gov 2.0 Radio and am pleased to announce every episode is now available on GovFresh.

Each week, hosts Adriel Hampton, GovLoop founder Steve Ressler and GovTwit founder Steve Lunceford review the latest Gov 2.0 news and talk with in-the-trenches Gov 2.0 leaders. For someone who isn’t a govie and is 3,000 miles from Washington, DC, their in-depth discussions provide valuable insight into the inner workings of government innovations, from local to federal.

Big thanks to Adriel, Steve and Steve for championing the great work going on around building better government.

Gov 2.0 Radio: Growing GovLoop

Listen

[audio:gov20radio090930.mp3]

Episode

GovLoop

Growing GovLoop: It was a big week for Gov 2.0 Radio co-host Steve Ressler, as his social network, GovLoop, joined G2C communications provider GovDelivery and Steve left the feds to manage the community full time. As GovLoop nears 20,000 members, we discuss how real collaboration between local, state and federal govies is catalyzing reform. Hear about new developments and initiatives on the network that’s helping make Gov 2.0 a reality. Joining the discussion will be Scott Burns of GovDelivery; Meghan Harvey, co-producer of Gov 2.0 Radio and new media producer for WomenCount.org; and Gov 2.0 Radio co-host and GovTwit founder Steve Lunceford. More Gov 2.0 Radio »