How to pick a citizen idea platform

Today, more than ever, there has been lots of talk about open innovation, idea collection, ideation and many other terms used to describe the collection of citizen feedback. Most idea collection platforms have been lumped together and only compared on the basis of price alone. Based upon our research at Manor Labs, in collaboration with the Persuasive Technology Lab at Stanford University, we have come to the conclusion that there are two distinctly different platforms for idea collection.

Gov 2.0 guide to Crisis Commons and CrisisCamp

CrisisCamps are efforts by local communities to garner the collective skills of volunteers, particularly technology related, to support relief efforts during crises, such as natural disasters. Crisis Commons is the supporting organization whose mission is “empowering global citizens to save lives through technology.” Most recently, CrisisCamps have been active in supporting relief efforts following the earthquake in Haiti. Here’s an overview of CrisisCamp, CrisisCommons and how you can connect and get involved.

GovLoop Member of the Week: Luke Fretwell

Originally posted on GovLoop by Andrew Krzmarzick

If you’ve seen a series of posts called “Gov 2.0 Heroes” here on GovLoop, then you probably know about Luke Fretwell’s launch of GovFresh just a few months ago. GovFresh is a great website with a comprehensive list of feeds from scores of government agencies. In addition, Luke is providing thought leadership and innovative new content with the “What Does Government Mean to You?” video project.

Since Luke has been highlighting a lot of other individuals around the Government 2.0 space with his “Heroes” feature, let’s turn the tables on GovFresh to hear his story. Enjoy the GovLoop version of “Gov 2.0 Hero: Luke Fretwell.”

Get the 311 with SeeClickFix

SeeClickFix lets citizens report public works issues such as potholes, graffiti, and wayward trash directly from their iPhones, the SeeClickFix Website or other sites using its embeddable widget. Citizens can create watch lists to follow what’s being reported in a particular area, comment and vote up or down other issue reports and get ‘Civic Points’ for their participation. Governments can use the service as a 311 work order management system and media outlets can integrate the reporting widget and map into their Websites for enhanced reader interaction.

‘Open Gov the Movie’

Open Gov the Movie is a 14-minute compilation of interviews with prominent open gov advocates, including U.S. Deputy CTO Beth Noveck, Sunlight Foundation’s Jake Brewer, City of Manor’s Dustin Haisler, Tim O’Reilly, EPA’s Jeffrey Levy, Deloitte’s Steve Lunceford and National Academy of Public Administration’s Lena Trudeau. The film was created by Delib.

17 open data apps for San Francisco

Last year, San Francisco opened up its data stream to the general public, encouraging developers to integrate the data into applications, sites, and bits of information the public could use. Since then, there’s been more than a dozen applications to utilize the data and turn it in to apps that make residents’ lives easier in a number of ways ~ from finding the best public transit options, to figuring out how to dispose of that old camera. You’ll find all this info and much more within these apps.

Gov 2.0 Hero: Dominic Campbell

Dominic Campbell, founder of FutureGov and TweetyHall, shares his thoughts on Gov 2.0., (is that what they call it?), in the UK.

What was your path to Gov 2.0?

I came to government straight out of university (I’d actually wanted to work in local government since I was 17, if can you believe it) where I was lucky enough to be given the opportunity to work my way around a local city council and poke, prod and challenge existing practice.

During this time, I was exposed to a wide range of public services and bodies and became very aware of the gap between image and reality surrounding people working in government. The vast majority are hard working, committed individuals who do it out of love and a real passion to change the world. But they are hindered all the way by bad management, poor leadership, a culture of risk aversion and blockers like awful IT systems that are made by robots for robots. I refused to believe things had to be this way.

Punk Rock Gov 2.0 Radio

I’m a big fan of Gov 2.0 Radio.

What I appreciate most is host Adriel Hampton‘s iterative approach to improving it. Each episode is a subtle experiment in something new. It’s not pretentious, over-produced or trendy chatter. It’s quality niche content and every episode is a solid course on what’s happening in the Gov 2.0, open government movement. Adriel and his co-hosts, Steve Lunceford and Steve Ressler, do a great job of connecting listeners to leaders and create a true sense of community.

Whiteboard Innovation: How Manor Ideas Become Solutions

The City of Manor’s open innovation portal, Manor Labs, has been live for a few months turning ideas into solutions. When talking with other cities, I find that the entire concept of open innovation is a bit misunderstood. It is very easy to put up a voting platform to rate ideas, but what happens afterwards? With Manor Labs, powered by the Spigit open innovation engine, the system is user-driven and self-sufficient. This allows our small agency the ability to process large quantities of ideas with limit staff involvement.

Here’s a breakdown of idea stages and functions.

Local beat: Crowdfunding community journalism

Spot.Us is a nonprofit effort from the Center for Media Change that supports community-funded investigative reporting. Citizens recommend and fund local news stories, which are then written by participating journalists and published on the site. Contributions are tax deductible and re-imbursed if a news organization buys exclusive rights to the content. The group currently operates ‘beats’ in Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area.

GovFreshTV sat down with founder David Cohn to discuss his vision:

5 U.S. mayors, 25 developers will make the Gov 2.0 American Dream Team

Tryouts for the Gov 2.0 American Dream Team are on. Alphagovs, alphageeks get ready to spec and code, because Code for America is recruiting 5 cities to take the lead in re-shaping the face of the American municipal IT department.

Prospective mayors and developers, imagine yourself announcing the launch of democracy’s defining technological turning point.

Imagine you could take advantage of the work of 5 city ventures and their innovative approach to technology and bring your city the esteem and engagement companies like Twitter and Facebook enjoy.

Gov 2.0 Hero: Daniel Newman

MAPLight.org Executive Director Daniel Newman

shares what his organization is doing and what it means for politics and money.

What was your path to Gov 2.0?

As a volunteer in politics, trying to improve my community, I realized the tremendous influence of wealthy interests which slant laws to their benefit. I co-founded MAPLight.org to shine the light of transparency on the river of money that underlies our politics and to help citizens hold their politicians accountable.