Month: December 2009

Best of GovFreshTV in 2009

GovFreshTV interviewed many of the leading figures in the open government, Gov 2.0 movement in 2009. It’s an incredible list of thinkers shaping the future of government.

I’m honored to have met and talked with each of them about the work they’re doing.

Here’s a review:

Craig Newmark

Craigslist founder Craig Newmark talks about Gov 2.0 and social media’s role in democracy.

Bill Eggers

Bill Eggers is the author of ‘Government 2.0’ and co-author of ‘If We Can Put a Man on the Moon: Getting Big Things Done in Government.’

Ellen Miller

Sunlight Foundation Co-founder and Executive Director Ellen Miller discusses open government, transparency and gov 2.0.

Clay Johnson

GovFreshTV talks with Sunlight Labs Director Clay Johnson.

Dmitry Kachaev

GovFreshTV talks with Dmitry Kachaev, Director of Research and Development, DC Government OCTO Labs.

Jake Brewer

Sunlight Foundation Engagement Director Jake Brewer discusses Gov 2.0, open government and transparency.

Mark Drapeau

Dr. Mark Drapeau (@cheek_geeky), co-chair of Gov 2.0 Expo, share his thoughts on Gov 2.0 in 2009, and what to expect in 2010.

Laurel Ruma

GovFreshTV talks with O’Reilly Media’s Laurel Ruma.

Silona Bonewald

GovFreshTV talks with Silona Bonewald of Citability.org and League of Technical Voters.

Jim Gilliam

GovFreshTV interview with NationBuilder, act.ly and whitehouse2.org founder Jim Gilliam.

SF mayor Newsom addresses open government plan to department heads

San Francisco public officials, including Mayor Gavin Newsom, discuss the launch of launch of DataSF.org and the city’s open government initiative at a meeting with city department heads. Highlights include Newsom’s overview of why the effort is important and Tim O’Reilly’s talk on government as a platform.

Quotable:

Gavin Newsom (Mayor, San Francisco):

“This is transformational. This is real. This is not insignificant from my perspective. This is not just incidental. This is fundamental … We have got to unleash the creative talent, not just inside all of us physically here, and within all of our city departments, but within the city and county of San Francisco, the region, the state, the nation. By giving people information you empower them, and with that information and empowerment comes innovation and new ideas at a scale and scope and speed that puts everything we’re doing in perspective. “

Ed Reiskin (Director, San Francisco Department of Public Works):

“All of this data that we use to run the government. This data is not our data. The data is for the public, for the people. The systems we use are not our systems. They’re the public’s systems. They’re for the people.”

Adventures for the Cure wins GovLoop AwesomeGov contest

GovLoop announced Adventures for the Cure has won the AwesomeGov Fund contest and will donate $1,789 to the charity, founded in 2005 by Adam Driscoll and Patrick Blair.

The donation will support Kupenda for the Children, a camp for disabled children in Kenya, and Extreme Weekend for Children with Diabetes, a camp for children with diabetes.

More details on GovLoop.

Video announcement from GovLoop founder Steve Ressler:

Video with AFC founders Adam Driscoll and Patrick Blair:

San Francisco’s DataSF launch

Here’s video from the August 2009 news conference announcing the launch of DataSF.org, San Francisco’s open data site, which provides “structured, raw and machine-readable government data to the public in an easily downloadable format.”

The press conference is attended by SF officials and technology entrepreneurs, including SF Mayor Gavin Newsom, SF CIO Chris Vein, SF Dept of Public Works Director Ed Reiskin, SF Director of Innovation Jay Nath, Tim O’Reilly and WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg. There’s a general Q&A that includes examples of how citizens and entrepreneurs are leveraging the newly-opened data.

For those working in local governments, this is a great overview of how citizens, local businesses and government officials are working together to make government more efficient and create economic opportunities for businesses simply by opening up public data.

Frankly, after watching this, I don’t see how more locales wouldn’t follow suit.

San Francisco’s open data directive

Full text or pdf of San Francisco’s Open Data Executive Directive:

Executive Directive 09-06
Open Data
October 21, 2009

By virtue of the power and authority vested in me by Section 3.100 of the San Francisco Charter to provide administration and oversight of all departments and governmental units in the executive branch of the City and County of San Francisco, I do hereby issue this Executive Directive to become effective immediately:

1. Benefits of the Open Data Directive

This Directive will enhance open government, transparency, and accountability by improving access to City data that adheres to privacy and security policies. Data which often resides in technology systems is unique from information like documents, emails and calendars in that it is structured and can be used by other computer applications for analysis or new uses such as mapping. This Directive establishes a one-stop destination for all approved City data that will help constituents make better use of information. This new ease of access will lead to innovation in how residents interact with government, resulting in social and economic benefits for the City.

The City and County of San Francisco will be able to engage our innovative high-tech workforce by releasing data, a key component of San Francisco’s future economic development. By providing government data that adheres to privacy and security policies, San Francisco’s world class technology community is given the platform from which to create useful civic tools, all at no cost to City government. By bringing City data and San Francisco’s entrepreneurs together, we can effectively leverage existing resources to stimulate industry, create jobs and highlight San Francisco’s creative culture and attractiveness as a place to live and work. Finally, the City and County of San Francisco’s technology presence will begin to reflect that of our world class, cutting edge private technology sector, and help us better engage the wealth of knowledge and skills of our local community.

2. The City declares its commitment to transparency in government data.

a. All datasets determined to be accessible to the public now and in the future shall be made available through DataSF.org.

b. All Department Heads or their designees shall strive to publish all datasets under their authority consistent with the DataSF authorization policy. Detailed information on how to update DataSF.org is available here: http://www.datasf.org/page.php?page=submit-dataset.

c. All Department Heads or their designees shall conduct quarterly reviews of their progress on providing access to datasets requested by the public through DataSF.org. The results of this review shall be sent to the Mayor’s Office.

For questions concerning this Executive Directive and its implementation, please contact: Brian Purchia, Mayor’s Office, brian.purchia@sfgov.org, 415-554-7135.

Gavin Newsom
Mayor

This week on GovFresh

This week’s news on GovFresh: