Month: November 2009

White House ‘Connect with your government online’ video

Just found this White House Blog post (Your Government: Open for Business in New Ways and New Places) and video from Bev Godwin (@BevUSA), White House New Media Director of Online Resources & Interagency Development.

The video, featuring Macon Phillips, White House New Media Director, highlights how government is using new media as a resource for citizens.

From the post:

So, look for opportunities to jump in and connect with your government — at our websites and blogs, through videos and photos, in social networks, through widgets, podcasts, and more. Abraham Lincoln knew what he was talking about. This is government of the people, by the people, for the people.

View, comment, rate, participate, and share. The government is paying attention, even as we continue to learn ourselves. The more people engage, the more meaningful all of this becomes, and the more progress we can make.

Download two free preview chapters of new ‘Open Government’ book from O’Reilly Media

Open Government: Collaboration, Transparency, and Participation in Practice Two preview chapters from Open Government: Collaboration, Transparency, and Participation in Practice are available for download. The book, available January 2010 from O’Reilly Media, is a “collection of essays, interviews, and case studies provides a multi-faceted and nonpartisan account of government as it becomes more transparent, collaborative, and participatory.”

Preview chapters include ‘Disrupting Washington’s Golden Rule’ by Ellen S. Miller and ‘Visualizing Policy and Politicians’ by Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg.

From the publisher:

This collection of essays, interviews, and case studies provides a multi-faceted and nonpartisan account of government as it becomes more transparent, collaborative, and participatory. Each chapter expresses the views of its prominent author, and the book as a whole offers a persuasive argument for transparency and interactivity in government at all levels. As a handbook for advocates of openness and e-government, Open Government provides a valuable mosaic of opinions from leading politicians, journalists, programmers, professors, and visionaries, making it a must-read, particularly in light of current events and technologies.

Topics include:

  • The beautiful vision: seamless access to government information that is remixable, meaningful citizen interaction with government officials, and improved government effectiveness through realtime data analysis and visualization
  • Transparency in the U.S. and abroad: solutions to bureaucratic indifference as well as government procurement biased towards proprietary, closed-source vendors
  • Open, semantic government using Web 2.0 technologies: mashing up government data, knowledge management via wiki, and the open source approach to government
  • Government 2.0 agenda for public participation: reforming government procurement, mandating the use of open standards, and bringing citizens into the government process

FCC Chairman Genachowski on CSPAN’s ‘The Communicators’

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski discusses universal broadband, spectrum policy, net neutrality, indecency and media ownership rules on CSPAN’s ‘The Communicators.’

Quotable:

It’s such an important time with respect to communications. Our communications infrastructure is increasingly essential to the daily lives of every American. It’s how we communicate with each other. It’s how we work in our businesses. It’s how we participate in our government. It’s how we create jobs and contribute to economic growth. I see our communications infrastructure as our platform for innovation and opportunity for the 21st century, and that’s what really drives what we’re trying to accomplish at the FCC of course, because the FCC is the federal agency that has to deal with this landscape. At the highest level our goals are, one, to promote investment throughout the communications eco-system, two, to promote innovation and thereby promote global competitiveness of the United States, three, to promote competition because that’s how we’ll get the most innovation and investment, and four, to protect and empower consumers.

New book ‘State of the eUnion: Government 2.0 and Onwards’ available free for download

State of the eUnion: Government 2.0 and Onwards

A new book, State of the eUnion: Government 2.0 and Onwards, is now available free for download. The book, a compilation of essays from 34 Gov 2.0 thought leaders, will soon be available in print through Amazon and elsewhere.

From the publisher:

“In many ways, eGovernment has come of age. The use of IT and digital media is today part of everything government does, so the ‘e’ is becoming obsolete. ‘eGovernment is just Government,’ as the saying goes, but it is important to realise that the ‘e’ has changed government forever, and will keep doing so, and hence we now talk about Government 2.0, ” said John Gotze.

The book’s contributors touch on a number of different subjects, all related to making government work better. Some deal with getting government data out into the open, breaking down data silos. Others focus on how to interact with the public through interactive websites. Still others discuss how to facilitate organizational change that will open up government.

Contributors:

  • Richard Allan, Facebook
  • Kim Normann Andersen, Copenhagen Business School
  • Tony Bovaird, Birmingham
 University
  • Lee Bryant, HeadShift
  • Joanne Caddy, OECD
  • Stephen Collins, AcidLabs
  • Dan Doney, US 
Office 
of 
the 
Director 
of 
National
 Intelligence
  • James Downe, Cardiff 
University
  • Mark Drapeau, National
 Defense
 University
  • Bengt Feil, TuTech
 Innovation
  • Dave Fletcher, State of Utah
  • Michael Friis, Folkets
 Ting
  • Matt Leighninger, Deliberative
 Democracy
 Consortium
  • Lawrence Lessig, Harvard
 Law
 School
  • Rolf Lührs, TuTech
 Innovation
  • Elke Löffler, Governance 
International
  • Rony Medaglia, Copenhagen Business School
  • Philipp S. Müller, Center
 for
 Public
 Management
 and 
Governance
  • David Osimo, Tech4i2
  • Tim O’Reilly, O’Reilly Inc.
  • Tommy Dejbjerg Pedersen, Geekhouse
  • Chris Potts, Dominic Barrow
  • Steve Radick, Booz
 Allen
 Hamilton
  • Harald Rathmann, TuTech
 Innovation
  • Steve Ressler, GovLoop
  • Alexandra Samuel, Social
Signal
  • W. David Stephenson, Stephenson Strategies
  • Hanne Sørum, The
 Norwegian
 School
 of
 Information
 Technology
  • Ariel Waldman, Spacehack.org
  • David Weinberger, Harvard
 Berkman
 Center
 for
 Internet
 & Society
  • Olov Östberg, Mid
 Sweden
 University

Thanksgoving

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, I wanted to take the time to thank every public servant doing his or her part to help refine and rejuvenate our American democracy.

I know this post may come off as corny, but I sincerely appreciate the work you do and the level of engagement you’ve given me, GovFresh and my non-govie peers.

Despite not getting paid a fair market value, or even the respect you deserve, you are in the trenches working against huge culture issues and a public hungry for change.

The push for open data, open source and a more open government isn’t just about social media and Web 2.0 jargon, but a stronger America. Your passion for openness and more citizen collaboration is setting a solid foundation.

Keep up the great work. Be proud of your service.

Happy Thanksgoving.

Entrepreneur, blogger Anil Dash announces venture to connect tech, government experts

Tech entrepreneur and blogger Anil Dash announced the launch of Expert Labs at Web 2.0 Expo NY 09.

Expert Labs will work with policy makers, technologists, scientists, researchers and academics to leverage crowdsourcing as a way to “help government listen” and create better policy.

“Dot gov is the new dot com,” said Dash, who was Vice President and Chief Evangelist at Six Apart, makers TypePad and Movable Type and will serve as Director of Expert Labs.

Expert Labs will run as part of the American Association for the Advancement of Science with a $500,000 grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Dash told attendees, “I hope you pay attention to the idea that Web 2.0 can serve the greater good than some of the trivial things we’ve done. We can actually help make our country better.”

More: