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Bay Area Rapid Transit Web Services Manager Timothy Moore discusses the recent upgrade of its flagship website, BART.gov, including a Drupal migration, embracing agile development, encouraging third-party developers to build off its open data and APIs, and plans for the future.

Today, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors will take its final vote to approve my update to our city’s groundbreaking open data law. My open data ordinance, in its simplest terms, standardizes and sets timelines for the release of appropriate city government data.

As we close out the year, I wanted to reflect on a few things to put our work in perspective and also to lay out the vision for where we want to go in the new year.

According to a document obtained by GovFresh, the California Department of General Services is issuing a list of stipulations to cloud computing vendors that forces them into an agreement to not sell their services to state agencies.

NYC Chief Urban Designer Alex Washburn will share his insights at CivicMeet Oakland on November 7, 5:00 to 7:00 p.m., SoMar.

Over the past few years, the civic innovation movement has grown tremendously. It’s exploded really. Ten years ago, who would have imagined that Chicago would be a national leader in open government data?

ArchiveSocial enables public sector organizations to embrace social media by minimizing risk and eliminating compliance barriers.

During last week’s 2013 Code for America summit at the Yerba Buena Center, officials from cities including Louisville, New York City, South Bend and New Orleans spoke about how open data had changed the complexion of their communities in public safety, citizen services and blight mapping.

A wrap-up of this week’s civic technology and open government news.

Today the City of Chicago launched the City of Chicago Data Dictionary, a single, comprehensive database catalog for the City of Chicago and City of Chicago sister agencies.

Gov. Jack Dalrymple named Mike Ressler as the state’s new chief information officer on Thursday.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory and Chief Information Officer Chris Estes cut the tape on a new state innovation center Thursday that gives employees a chance to test-drive technology products before the state procures.

In recent months, we’ve highlighted several efforts to teach young people how to code and about technology. These efforts have included Englewood Codes, Civic Summer and Adler Planetarium’s Youth Hackathon.

Delaware is in the process of beginning a new delaware.gov redesign and is asking for the public’s input in the form of a short survey.

The new tagline, “It’s our nature,” says the state, symbolizes the state’s “awe-inspiring scenery and life-loving people. It connects adventure with entrepreneurship, beauty with happiness and fresh air with creativity.”

Spearheaded by SF’s Office of Innovation and led by Mayor Ed Lee Senior Advisor Rahul Mewawalla, the program will embed “world-class entrepreneurial teams” into the inner workings of government to help inspire the next big civic thing and a new spin on the initial public offering.

Registration is still open for the 2013 Code for America Summit set for October 15 to 17 in San Francisco.

The policy calls for the city “to make every reasonable effort to publish its data in machine readable formats using prevailing open standards” and directs the city administrator to lead the effort under a specific timeline.

After nearly a year since it first announced proposed open data legislation that included the creation of a city chief data officer, San Francisco has officially posted the position.

Lee announced the city posted municipal code on GitHub “to make it more accessible to our public.”

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