The goal of the annual event is to “bring together citizens, software developers, and entrepreneurs together to collaboratively create, build, and invent new solutions using publicly-released data, code and technology to improve our communities and the governments that serve them.”

The program lasts four months and includes training and mentorship, network and publicity, in-kind services and support and $25,000.

The Award for Public Engagement in Government is a new component to the center’s standing Innovations in American Government Awards program.

Much like we pooh-poohed Twitter in those early days, GitHub, in its early crawl, is today dismissed simply as a tool for the diehard developer. However, as with any tool with great potential, innovators find new ways to leverage emerging technology to communicate, and government chief information and technology officers can effectively do this with GitHub.

The White House is now accepting applications for the 2014 Presidential Innovation Fellows program.

There’s a new topic posted on the US Government APIs Google group inquiring about instances of government agencies using pay models for government APIs.

Code for America’s Catherine Bracy has a great TED Talk on civic hacking and one of America’s greatest civic hackers, Ben Franklin, inspired a brigade of do-good developers across the world.

GovFresh 2013 Civic Organization of the Year, Datos Abiertos, Transparencia y Acceso a la información, shares its work and plans for the future.

Davenport Institute’s Pete Peterson has spent the last seven years working with local governments on improving their approach to public engagement. Now, he’s running for California secretary of state on a platform centered around civic innovation.

GovFresh 2013 Small City of the Year Piqua, Ohio, is a shining example of the old adage “small is beautiful.” With its multi-pronged approach to engaging citizens, Piqua is proof that it doesn’t take a big city budget to execute big civic ideas.